Batsto Village – Hammonton

Take a trip into New Jersey’s historic past at Batsto Village, located in Wharton State Forest, in the heart of the scenic Pinelands National Reserve.
 
The village, which dates from 1766, was originally a center for bog iron production. Today, the restored village gives visitors a chance to immerse themselves in the past.
 
Start your adventure at the visitor’s center, where you’ll find maps and a cell phone audio tour. Guided tours are available several times a week.
 
A good jumping-off point is the historic Mansion, originally occupied by noted iron master John Reed, who built the first ironworks here along the Batsto River.
 
In 1773, he sold the property to John Cox, who made provisions for the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War.
 
In the 19th century, the mansion was renovated into the elegant Italianate style of architecture by Joseph Wharton, a Philadelphia businessman.

Other owners throughout the 18th and 19th centuries created the village that exists today.
 
Among the structures open for exploration are the iron furnace, gristmill, sawmill, general store and ice house.
 

Location

United States
39° 38' 30.426" N, 74° 38' 49.9452" W
See map: Google Maps
Batsto Village in the Pine Barrens
Batsto Village – Hammonton
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Take a trip into New Jersey’s historic past at Batsto Village, located in Wharton State Forest, in the heart of the scenic Pinelands National Reserve.
 
The village, which dates from 1766, was originally a center for bog iron production. Today, the restored village gives visitors a chance to immerse themselves in the past.
 
Start your adventure at the visitor’s center, where you’ll find maps and a cell phone audio tour. Guided tours are available several times a week.
 
A good jumping-off point is the historic Mansion, originally occupied by noted iron master John Reed, who built the first ironworks here along the Batsto River.
 
In 1773, he sold the property to John Cox, who made provisions for the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War.
 
In the 19th century, the mansion was renovated into the elegant Italianate style of architecture by Joseph Wharton, a Philadelphia businessman.

Other owners throughout the 18th and 19th centuries created the village that exists today.
 
Among the structures open for exploration are the iron furnace, gristmill, sawmill, general store and ice house.
 


 Don’t Miss:

• The Country Living Fair, held in October, with crafts, food and demonstrations.
 
• Guided canoe tours on the Batsto River.
 
• Mailing a postcard from the still-functioning 18th-century post office.
 
Insider Tip:
Nearby Hammonton is often referred to as the blueberry capital of the world, so don’t miss out on these healthy berries when you’re in the area.
 
Peak season is mid-June to mid-August. You can pick your own (and, naturally, sample a few as you go) at Lindsay’s Pick Your Own Blueberries (Pleasant Mills Rd).

 

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