Parks

 New Jersey is blessed with hundreds of thousands of acres of state and national parks, forests and recreation areas.
 
New Jersey's Division of Parks and Forestry oversees 50 state parks, 11 forests and more than 50 historic sites all across New Jersey and offers visitors a near endless array of outdoor activities along with numerous camping sites.
 
In addition, there are hundreds of county parks that offer a wide selection of outdoor activities. 
 
The National Park Service (NPS) operates five national parks in New Jersey: Morristown National Historical Park, the Sandy Hook Unit of the Gateway National Recreation Area, the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area and the Great Falls of the Passaic River (New Jersey’s Newest National Historical Park).
 
Being the second largest waterfall by volume east of the Mississippi River (next to Niagara Falls),The Great Falls of the Passaic River is centered in an industrial historic district, considered to be “The Cradle of American Industry.” 
 
The NPS also operates the Thomas Edison National Historic Park in West Orange. The park is the site of Edison's invention factory, laboratory, workshops where he developed the phonograph and the motion picture camera.
 
Morristown National Historic Park features a preserved area that was occupied by Gen. George Washington and the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War.
 
Washington selected the area because of its logistical, geographical and topographical military advantages and its location to New York City, which was occupied by the British.
 
The Delaware Water Gap encompasses nearly 70,000 acres of breathtaking scenery along 40 miles of the Delaware River, which winds through the Appalachian Mountains.
 
Visitors will find waterfalls and many outdoor activities, including canoeing, hiking, camping, swimming, biking, cross-country skiing, fishing and more.
 
Nearly two million people a year visit Sandy Hook to enjoy the park's 1,665 acres of ocean and bay beaches, fishing, hiking, natural areas, the Sandy Hook Lighthouse and historic Fort Hancock.
 
And there’s the 1.1-million-acre Pinelands National Preserve, which is an ideal location for camping, fishing, cycling, birding and hiking.
 
Island Beach State Park features more than 3,000 acres and 10 miles of white sand beach that attracts swimmers, sunbathers, anglers and surfers.
 
Modern bathhouses, beach access ramps, a mile of beach with lifeguards, historic buildings, trails, interpretive programs, bike paths and facilities for people with disabilities combine to make the park a unique place to explore.
 
The park is one of New Jersey's last significant remnants of a barrier island ecosystem that once existed along much of the coast and it’s also one of the few remaining undeveloped barrier beaches on the north Atlantic coast.
 
High Point State Park offers superb trails for hikers and skiers and quiet spots for campers and anglers. The land for park was  donated by Col. Anthony R. and Susie Dryden Kuser, was dedicated as a park in 1923.
 
The view from High Point Monument, at 1,803 feet above sea level, is a spectacular panorama of rich farmland and forest, soft hills and lush valleys in three states. The blue line of the Delaware River divides the verdant ridges of New Jersey from those of Pennsylvania.
 
Liberty State Park is a green oasis in the middle of Metropolitan northern New Jersey. With the Manhattan skyline, the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island as a spectacular backdrop, Liberty State Park is one of the state's most dramatic parks.
 
For information of ferry service to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island via Statue Cruises visit www.statuecruises.com or call 877-523-9849.The park also features the historic Central Railroad of New Jersey Terminal (CRRNJ), a grand setting for much of New Jersey's transportation history in the northeast, sits prominently at the north end of the park.
 
Lake Hopatcong is the state's largest lake and offers a vast array of recreational and boating opportunities at the Bridge Marina. Visitors will also find restaurants and the lake hosts many, many special events and concerts. 
 
Visit New Jersey Division of Parks and Forestry website for more information on state parks. For information on national parks visit  The National Park Service website.
 
 
 

Location

United States
40° 42' 26.82" N, 74° 2' 10.2444" W
See map: Google Maps
Delaware Water Gap National Park
Parks
Javascript is required to view this map.

 New Jersey is blessed with hundreds of thousands of acres of state and national parks, forests and recreation areas.
 
New Jersey's Division of Parks and Forestry oversees 50 state parks, 11 forests and more than 50 historic sites all across New Jersey and offers visitors a near endless array of outdoor activities along with numerous camping sites.
 
In addition, there are hundreds of county parks that offer a wide selection of outdoor activities. 
 
The National Park Service (NPS) operates five national parks in New Jersey: Morristown National Historical Park, the Sandy Hook Unit of the Gateway National Recreation Area, the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area and the Great Falls of the Passaic River (New Jersey’s Newest National Historical Park).
 
Being the second largest waterfall by volume east of the Mississippi River (next to Niagara Falls),The Great Falls of the Passaic River is centered in an industrial historic district, considered to be “The Cradle of American Industry.” 
 
The NPS also operates the Thomas Edison National Historic Park in West Orange. The park is the site of Edison's invention factory, laboratory, workshops where he developed the phonograph and the motion picture camera.
 
Morristown National Historic Park features a preserved area that was occupied by Gen. George Washington and the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War.
 
Washington selected the area because of its logistical, geographical and topographical military advantages and its location to New York City, which was occupied by the British.
 
The Delaware Water Gap encompasses nearly 70,000 acres of breathtaking scenery along 40 miles of the Delaware River, which winds through the Appalachian Mountains.
 
Visitors will find waterfalls and many outdoor activities, including canoeing, hiking, camping, swimming, biking, cross-country skiing, fishing and more.
 
Nearly two million people a year visit Sandy Hook to enjoy the park's 1,665 acres of ocean and bay beaches, fishing, hiking, natural areas, the Sandy Hook Lighthouse and historic Fort Hancock.
 
And there’s the 1.1-million-acre Pinelands National Preserve, which is an ideal location for camping, fishing, cycling, birding and hiking.
 
Island Beach State Park features more than 3,000 acres and 10 miles of white sand beach that attracts swimmers, sunbathers, anglers and surfers.
 
Modern bathhouses, beach access ramps, a mile of beach with lifeguards, historic buildings, trails, interpretive programs, bike paths and facilities for people with disabilities combine to make the park a unique place to explore.
 
The park is one of New Jersey's last significant remnants of a barrier island ecosystem that once existed along much of the coast and it’s also one of the few remaining undeveloped barrier beaches on the north Atlantic coast.
 
High Point State Park offers superb trails for hikers and skiers and quiet spots for campers and anglers. The land for park was  donated by Col. Anthony R. and Susie Dryden Kuser, was dedicated as a park in 1923.
 
The view from High Point Monument, at 1,803 feet above sea level, is a spectacular panorama of rich farmland and forest, soft hills and lush valleys in three states. The blue line of the Delaware River divides the verdant ridges of New Jersey from those of Pennsylvania.
 
Liberty State Park is a green oasis in the middle of Metropolitan northern New Jersey. With the Manhattan skyline, the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island as a spectacular backdrop, Liberty State Park is one of the state's most dramatic parks.
 
For information of ferry service to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island via Statue Cruises visit www.statuecruises.com or call 877-523-9849.The park also features the historic Central Railroad of New Jersey Terminal (CRRNJ), a grand setting for much of New Jersey's transportation history in the northeast, sits prominently at the north end of the park.
 
Lake Hopatcong is the state's largest lake and offers a vast array of recreational and boating opportunities at the Bridge Marina. Visitors will also find restaurants and the lake hosts many, many special events and concerts. 
 
Visit New Jersey Division of Parks and Forestry website for more information on state parks. For information on national parks visit  The National Park Service website.
 
 
 


Related Stories

Hiking in New Jersey
 With a name like Cranberry Lake you might envision a bog in the flatlands of the Pine Barrens.   This 180-acre lake,...
Fall Color
When Autumn arrives some outdoor enthusiasts lament the waning daylight, this season certainly has a bright side.   Before...
New Jersey is the site of a number of critically important battles during the Revolutionary War. In fact, it was the Battles of...